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Get Nichols, DPM know Dr. Adam If he had not become a Doc- tor of Podiatric Medicine, per- haps Dr. Adam Nichols could have been a detective. After all, detective work is at the soul of Dr. Nichols' work as a Podiatrist in the Windom Area Health Outreach Clinic. He says that aspect is one of the things that drew him into this field. "You have to listen to people, Dr. Adam and maybe after listening you can discern some things. Being able to take that history and then do the physical work, maybe you can catch something someone else thought was completely different." Nichols has been employed at Sanford Health in Sioux Falls for six years. He comes to the Windom Area Health Outreach Clinic the fourth Friday of each month, something he has been doing for about four months. His scope of practice is in surgical and non- surgical management of bunions, hammertoes, neuromas/nerve problems, other deformities of the foot, ingrown toenails, foot pain, diabetic wounds and infections, flat feet, high-arched feet, arthritic joints, fractures and dislocations of the foot and ankle. He is also a co-director and provider in the Wound & Hyperbaric Healing Center at Windom Area Health, seeing patients with lower extremity and foot wounds. He works closely with vascular surgeons and other specialties, handling wound care and anything foot-related that needs to be ad- dressed. "It is important to salvage limbs," Nichols said. "Keeping people on their feet makes a big differ- ence in their lives." Among the most common things Nichols sees are diabetic foot ulcers. "Ideally, I like to see people with the Windom Area Health Outreach Clinic, the before they have them," Nichols said. "I also see bunions, hammer toes, ingrown toenails and of Wound Center (which he calls, "phenomenal") and the staff that works there. Nichols says he sometimes sees patients sort of limp into his office. By the time he finishes work- ing with them, they aren't necessarily dancing out, but there's a good chance they'll be walking out. "I can see them recover," Nichols said. "That's the more instant gratification that you see in some cases with podiatry. The ability to bring comfort to people, I think, is fun." "There's a lot to like about the region," Nichols added. "Folks have been incredibly friendly. That's a Midwest thing. "I like the weather. Spring and fall are spectacu- lar here and summer is fairly mild, compared to Texas. Winter is very cold, but honestly i like that, too." Being around a state blessed with plenty to do outdoors doesn't hurt, either. Nichols Dr. Nichols is married with two children. In his Nichols' background A native of Bend, Oregon, Nichols attended Or- egon State University and Samuel Merritt Univer- sity to become a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine. He completed his residency at Hunt Regional Medical Center in Greenville, Texas and his Fellowship in Wound Surgery at the University of Texas outhwestern's Department of Plastic Surgery in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Nichols is board-certified for foot surgery through the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. While in Texas, Nichols was in touch with a friend who is a podiatrist in Aberdeen. That friend mentioned that Sanford was looking to hire a podiatrist. "I was happy to land in Sioux Falls with Sanford and have been really happy there," Nichols said. He also noted that he has been very impressed spare time, he enjoys hunting, fishing and hiking with his family. Parting advice As Nichols was wrapping up the discussion about his practice, he was asked if he has any advice for people with foot issues. He didn't hesitate with his answer. "Don't wait," Nichols said. "Don't wait to get looked at, particularly for the diabetic wounds. Pain is a gift and sometimes if you don't have pain, you waited a little too long. "Even if it's planter fasciitis, sometimes you'll see people wait. They'll start walking differently to avoid whatever hurts. Then, before you know it, something else starts hurting. "Just come in and have it looked at, before it be- comes a bigger issue. Stick one finger in the dam, before you have to stick 10 fingers in it." W WINDOM AREA HEALTH 507-831-2400 2150 Hospital Drive · Windom www.windomareahealth.org Outreach Get Nichols, DPM know Dr. Adam If he had not become a Doc- tor of Podiatric Medicine, per- haps Dr. Adam Nichols could have been a detective. After all, detective work is at the soul of Dr. Nichols' work as a Podiatrist in the Windom Area Health Outreach Clinic. He says that aspect is one of the things that drew him into this field. "You have to listen to people, Dr. Adam and maybe after listening you can discern some things. Being able to take that history and then do the physical work, maybe you can catch something someone else thought was completely different." Nichols has been employed at Sanford Health in Sioux Falls for six years. He comes to the Windom Area Health Outreach Clinic the fourth Friday of each month, something he has been doing for about four months. His scope of practice is in surgical and non- surgical management of bunions, hammertoes, neuromas/nerve problems, other deformities of the foot, ingrown toenails, foot pain, diabetic wounds and infections, flat feet, high-arched feet, arthritic joints, fractures and dislocations of the foot and ankle. He is also a co-director and provider in the Wound & Hyperbaric Healing Center at Windom Area Health, seeing patients with lower extremity and foot wounds. He works closely with vascular surgeons and other specialties, handling wound care and anything foot-related that needs to be ad- dressed. "It is important to salvage limbs," Nichols said. "Keeping people on their feet makes a big differ- ence in their lives." Among the most common things Nichols sees are diabetic foot ulcers. "Ideally, I like to see people with the Windom Area Health Outreach Clinic, the before they have them," Nichols said. "I also see bunions, hammer toes, ingrown toenails and of Wound Center (which he calls, "phenomenal") and the staff that works there. Nichols says he sometimes sees patients sort of limp into his office. By the time he finishes work- ing with them, they aren't necessarily dancing out, but there's a good chance they'll be walking out. "I can see them recover," Nichols said. "That's the more instant gratification that you see in some cases with podiatry. The ability to bring comfort to people, I think, is fun." "There's a lot to like about the region," Nichols added. "Folks have been incredibly friendly. That's a Midwest thing. "I like the weather. Spring and fall are spectacu- lar here and summer is fairly mild, compared to Texas. Winter is very cold, but honestly i like that, too." Being around a state blessed with plenty to do outdoors doesn't hurt, either. Nichols Dr. Nichols is married with two children. In his Nichols' background A native of Bend, Oregon, Nichols attended Or- egon State University and Samuel Merritt Univer- sity to become a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine. He completed his residency at Hunt Regional Medical Center in Greenville, Texas and his Fellowship in Wound Surgery at the University of Texas outhwestern's Department of Plastic Surgery in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Nichols is board-certified for foot surgery through the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. While in Texas, Nichols was in touch with a friend who is a podiatrist in Aberdeen. That friend mentioned that Sanford was looking to hire a podiatrist. "I was happy to land in Sioux Falls with Sanford and have been really happy there," Nichols said. He also noted that he has been very impressed spare time, he enjoys hunting, fishing and hiking with his family. Parting advice As Nichols was wrapping up the discussion about his practice, he was asked if he has any advice for people with foot issues. He didn't hesitate with his answer. "Don't wait," Nichols said. "Don't wait to get looked at, particularly for the diabetic wounds. Pain is a gift and sometimes if you don't have pain, you waited a little too long. "Even if it's planter fasciitis, sometimes you'll see people wait. They'll start walking differently to avoid whatever hurts. Then, before you know it, something else starts hurting. "Just come in and have it looked at, before it be- comes a bigger issue. Stick one finger in the dam, before you have to stick 10 fingers in it." W WINDOM AREA HEALTH 507-831-2400 2150 Hospital Drive · Windom www.windomareahealth.org Outreach